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Thread: Vintage Oval Track Modifieds...

  1. #881
    Airman Zoera's Avatar
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    That 'X' was a dirt car that ran Lebanon Valley, NY

  2. #882
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zoera View Post
    No, it actually came from the Plainville CT area. From what I understand, it was sitting on some property over there for several years. I just happened to talk to a guy who was cleaning up the property, and found some old race car stuff. Lucky break for me.
    That yellow coupe is the Riiska's Garage car from Winsted, CT. They had lots of cars over the years, I'll look through my files for more photos.
    Zoera... My mistake. Went back looking at picks of frames and bodies... close but not a match.
    Attached Images

  3. #883
    Airman Zoera's Avatar
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    Here's two photos of the 'X' that I found. I'll search my files this week for anything else that might be there. These may not be 'Riiskas' cars.




  4. #884
    Airman Zoera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by s10ace View Post
    Zoera... My mistake. Went back looking at picks of frames and bodies... close but not a match.
    That's a real nice piece, would love to have it. I don't care much for the front end setup, but that would be easy to convert back to a Flemke setup.

  5. #885
    Airman Zoera's Avatar
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    Here's the other car I'm finishing up, the George 'Moose' Hewitt Cavalier that he ran from '86 to '96 at Waterford, Stafford and Thompson. It sat for fourteen years in Steve Butova's garage before I acquired it last year. Not much left to do on it, but this thing should run like a bear because it's fairly modern and has the original race engine. I had to redo the drivers' side door skin (as well as the rear panels), but I was told the original door skin was hanging on someone's garage wall. I would love to find it, but whoever has it probably would not part with it. Oh, well...
    The coupe will be more for display and exhibition runs.



    Last edited by Zoera; 01-15-2012 at 02:15 AM. Reason: correction

  6. #886
    Airman Rentawrench's Avatar
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    S10ace go to Ely's around your home they used to be the Valley track photo person . Chuck Ely photo's an see what they have Butch Jelly's sister Jo Ann was Chuck's wife. or you can try contacting Bob Ely thru http://lebanonvalleyclassics.com/

  7. #887
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rentawrench View Post
    S10ace go to Ely's around your home they used to be the Valley track photo person . Chuck Ely photo's an see what they have Butch Jelly's sister Jo Ann was Chuck's wife. or you can try contacting Bob Ely thru http://lebanonvalleyclassics.com/
    Rentawrench...thanks for the info.

  8. #888
    Sergeant ModifiedDriver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zoera View Post
    Depends on what you want to end up with. If you want a true vintage 50's-60's modified, you don't 'Z' the frame. It'll sit higher, but that's what you want. If you want to take it a little later, say 70-75, you 'Z' it and maybe add some tubing here and there.
    Here's what I acquired today. Looks like a 52 Chevy frame that someone started a modified project with and never finished it. It has some rust, but nothing that can't be dealt with. True NOS.






    You're about 1/2 correct. Your dates are a little off, but it also depends upon if you were running asphalt or dirt.

    At this time I was located a short distance from Willy Young's Garage and Tremont's shop that were within shouting distance of each other. I was a Lebanon Valley, '56 Chevy, late model runner and wanted to move up to modifieds. Tommy Correllis drove the #28 coach Young car, owned by John Warren, and Chuck Ely, who got the ride after Joe Messina left, drove the #115 coach (an Oldsmobile body that I sold to the Hughes Brothers and they then sold to Tremont). While home from college, I worked part time pumping gas for Spencer Hughes who had a Sunoco station, right across the street from Averill Park High School. His brother Carlton, the other half of the famous Hughes brothers racing team, had a Sunoco station on the Troy side of the Menands Bridge. That's where they kept the #57.

    Anyway, I'd be over at all these garages all the time to see what was cooking. I'd also go to Albany/Saratoga Speedway on Friday nights to see what was current with the NASCAR asphalt bunch.

    The mid-60's and late 60's saw the cars getting lower. About the time the bodies were being relocated on the frames rearward is when the stock frames started being wacked. More for dirt than asphalt. Why? Because the dirt guys needed more suspension travel than the pavement runners. Look at the pics of that stock frame. By the time ya' got the car low, the rear axle tube would be within 1-2 inches of the frame rail. You'd bottom the suspension out on dirt.

    I remember the #28 coach being built. First, they started with a chassis built by Bob Rossell. The same guy that drove the #56 and built a few of Will Cagle's cars at that time. A couple were unique because they used square tubing for a cage. Anyway, the frame was cut and kicked up in the back and they used Chysler leaf springs. The cut was made right where the front rear spring hanger is. The hanger relocated outside on the frame side to get lower. On this car I don't think they cut the front of the frame, that would be done on later cars. I also remember seeing "1 inch lead" wrote in soapstone on the right front frame rail. I remember joking with Young and asking him what 1" lead (pronouned as the heavy metal) was!!! But we all knew the real meaning.

    The #115 was pretty much a copy of the #28. These cars had no down tubes in the front and were Flexi-Flyers. During the week I'd go by Tremonts and they'd have jackstands under the main frame rails beaneath the driver's area. They'd have a heavy piece of I-beam and other heavy chunks of steel on the front bumper trying to get the frame to "relax".

    Now ya' have to remember that the Tobias and Profile tube chassis made an appearance in the late 60's and became real popular in the early 70's. Eddie Demolino was one of the first to have a Tobias at the Valley and it had a Pinto body on it. I think that was '70. NASCAR had a stock frame rule until they changed it for the '73 racing season allowing tube chassis. I built a stock frame modified in '71-72 that I was going to run at Fonda under NASCAR rules. The car was obsolete when I hit the track in '73. I copied a lot of what Young and Tremont had on their coaches. It had the frame kicked in the rear. Used a '65 'Cuda body.

    So this idea of what is vintage and not vintage can vary depending upon where you were and what surface you were running on. A blanket statement is erroneous. That pic of the blue #54 is an example of a stock frame car with the body mounted in the stock location. The pics of the "X" coupe were that of the next era.
    Last edited by ModifiedDriver; 01-15-2012 at 09:29 PM.

  9. #889
    DBA Flyin'Brian12's Avatar
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    Maynard Troyer used the International Scout frame, cut the rear, and weld it back on, upside down, to get a kick-up. Also, late '60's-early '70's asphalt cars had a lot of engine offset, and drivers sat as rearward as possible.

  10. #890
    Sergeant ModifiedDriver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlalique View Post
    Attachment 2724Attachment 2725Attachment 2726Attachment 2727Attachment 2728

    Here a few pics from the build. Four finger Frankie Hager (modifieddriver)took dimensions from his 36' vintage modified and prepared sketch for the frame fabrication. I have about 4" ground clearance to bottom of frame. Hope this helps.

    To clarify a bit more. I did the plans taking measurements from his original '36 body and the '36 coupe in my avatar picture. I had to establish a wheelbase, calculated the amount of engine set-back, then firewall location and proportion accordingly for the proper period correct look. My existing '36 was of little value to develop the plans. It was a dirt car with the body hung with a nose down attitude and more engine set-back. With the help of Mike Matheny, one of my car buddies, we built the chassis, cage, mocked the body in the correct location and did the front end and rear end suspension systems installation. All this was at Matheny's shop.

    The only deviation from my original plans was the use of Landrum Pony Stock, not Chrysler leaf rear springs. The Chryslers were too long and would've extended beyond the rear body work. I opted for the shorter springs using sliders instead of shackles to get the car low.

    I wanted a 4" ride height and the main rails were set to that height on the frame jig. Everything for the suspension was then based off this.

    The only real problem with the car is that when the owner had the bodywork done, they didn't cut the rear wheel openings high enough in the body. The tire would bottom out on the opening before the suspension bottomed out. I think he put extra thick bump stops on the frame to prevent this from happening.

    Even the highest available rate Landrum Pony Stock rear springs are a little too light for the weight of the car. There needs to be an additional leaf added or the springs need more arch. The ride was excellent, so I'd opt for a re-arch job and retain the spring rate. This is something I do all the time in my shop with a hand sledge and stepped steel plate.

    This stuff isn't rocket science. BUT some previous experience, from years ago, goes a long way in making things happen and knowing the sequence of events to make it come right.

    That's why I say cut the frame now. It's only metal. If ya' screw up ya' can always fix it. You're aren't working with a piece of wood. If ya' cut that wrong it's time for the fireplace.

    I'll see if I can find some more old pics of my 'Cuda build.

    AND, that frame on the trailer a few posts ago looks older than '52. I think it's a '46-'48. The rails don't curve out to the rockers very much.

    Go back in the archives here and look for the pics of the Jarzombek white #1 coupe where he sat on the right side and the engine was offset to the left. That's a stock Chevy chassis with cuts in it, to the extreme. Remember this was an asphalt only car. Too low for dirt. There's a pic here someplace of the car bottom where he's taking down the catch fence at Dover. Shortly thereafter NASCAR allowed tube chassis.
    Last edited by ModifiedDriver; 01-15-2012 at 10:42 PM.

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