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Thread: Mallock U2 Mk6

  1. #1
    MP metalshapes's Avatar
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    Mallock U2 Mk6

    I bought this car in the late '80s.

    I knew I wanted a early U2, because those still had the swingaxle front suspension.

    The Mk7 was the first Mallock U2 with double A-arm IFS.

    So after several years of trying to track one down that was for sale, and that I could afford ( in other words, in need of restoration ), I found this one.

    U2.jpg

    A mid '60s Mk6.

    It was for sale in Dover England, the seller specialised in vintage racecars and racecar parts.

    It was really pretty rough, but that didn't matter...

    I was a young man in love...

    Mk6.jpg

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    MP metalshapes's Avatar
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    It had been a hillclimb racer on Guernsey, one of the channel islands.

    And at one point it had a full race steel bottom end Lotus Twincam engine bored out to 1840cc.

    That engine was long gone when I found the car.

    It had been modernised with later spec Mallock parts, like the rear fenders and nose and the rear bodywork had been modified into a duck tail shape.
    ( this was also normal for the later Mallock U2's )

    I took all those parts off, changed the back to the earler spec rounded tail, and reskinned the frame in new aluminum sheet.
    ( very thin... its almost like painted aluminum foil...)

    mallock.jpg

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    MP metalshapes's Avatar
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    At first, the car had severe handling problems.

    I invested in the right 10" shortened gearbox.

    These boxes have most of the tail end cut off, with a new end welded on that holds the rear seal with the output shaft that is shortened to match.

    This will get the engine and gearbox back in the chassis as far as it will go, with a 9" long driveshaft ( from u-joint C/L to u-joint C/L) going back to a BMC rear axle that has the diff offset to the left.
    These rear axles are normally made up out of Morris Minor and Austin Healey Sprite parts.

    And I took the car to Mallock Racing in Nortands England.

    The Mallock's are great people, they were very generous with their knowledge and advise.

    Specially Arthur ( this was before he passed away ).
    But I also got along great with his son Richard, and Richards wife Sue.

    Arthur, an employee who worked at Mallock Racing and me worked on my car for about 3 days to sort out the worst of the problems.

    I learned a huge amount about Mallock Racecars in those couple of days.

    And it was a very special experience for me.

    Here are some pics of Arthur next to my car.

    Arthur Mallock 01.JPG

    Arthur Mallock 02.jpg
    Last edited by metalshapes; 09-28-2012 at 05:44 AM.

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    MP metalshapes's Avatar
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    After that, the handling was much better.

    And I raced it for a season or two.

    But then I had to park it.
    ( I thought it was going to be for just a couple of years, but it ended up being close to 20...)

    But fortunately, I was able to hang on to it.

    It was just sitting on 4 flat tires ( old racing tires just wont hold air ), with a thick layer of dust on it.

    100.jpg

  5. #5
    MP metalshapes's Avatar
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    A couple of moths ago I decided it was time to get it out of the mothballs.

    I did some basic stuff to it.

    Rebuilt the carbs, put in a new fuelpump, check brakes, etc.

    I bolted on my least old ( but still very old ) set of racing slicks, and took it to the track.

    The tires were like driving on ice, so I had to take it really easy.

    And I found out there was a whole list of other things that still needed to be done.

    But at least I had a baseline, and I had a blast...

    4 23 12 069.jpg

    4 23 12 068.jpg

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    MP metalshapes's Avatar
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    I've had it out after that a couple of times.

    Slowly eliminating some of the problems it has.

    Last time I had it out I snapped a halfshaft in the rear axle.

    9 21 12 017.jpg

    9 21 12 016.jpg

    That is not unusual, I've broken quite a few in this car.

    And because its a known weakspot I bought a better upgraded rear axle that Mallock Racing built for me.
    ( this was about 20 years ago, I can now make one myself...)

    Its a special hybrid axle that has the housing and diff of an English Ford Axle ( Mk1 Escort, Cortina, etc ), the ends and bearings off a BMC axle, and special machined hubs and semi full floating axles from Quaife.

    Dash 005.jpg

  7. #7
    MP metalshapes's Avatar
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    So I finally got the old BMC axle out of the car.
    ( you can really see the offset diff in this pic )

    9 21 12 006.jpg

    And prepare the Hybrid axle to go back in.

    The new axle was set up to run with dics.

    Which is fine, but drums fit the age of the car better.

    Even better than the regular cast iron Morris/ AH Sprite drums would be a set of Minifin drums.

    These are super rare...

    When I told people I wanted a set 20years ago, they'd start laughing at me...

    They were originally made to be used on racing Mini's.

    And they came in two types.

    The ones with a built in spacer ( like the rear drums on a OG Mini Cooper S)

    And the narrow ones without the spacer.

    The narrow ones are what can be used on a BMC axle.

    But I was very fortunate to be able to get a set trading off some work on another Mallock, several years ago.

    Since the axle was built to get discs, this was not a simple bolt on.

    And since the drums were made to be used on a Mini, they were not exactly right for a BMC axle either.

    They did not have enough of a locating lip on the inside to grab the back of the hub.

    Which meant that they wouldnt center correctly.

    I made a ring that is a tight fit inside the drum, but with a tall enough lip to locate it.

    9 21 12 008.jpg

    This meant that I had to build a spacer to reposition the backing plate, so the brake shoes were still grabbing on the right spot in the drum.

    9 21 12 009.jpg

    I went from the beautifully machined aluminum hubs back to a set of original steel BMC ones ( I had to, the aluminum ones wouldnt clear the shoes and slave cylinder ), but I did upgrade those from 3/8" studs to 7/16" ones.

    9 21 12 013.jpg

    9 21 12 014.jpg

    9 21 12 015.jpg

    When everything was back together I weighed it, and I was surprised that the new hybrid axle only weighs 8Lb more than the BMC one.
    And that is with a heavier housing, bigger gears, and a cast iron carrier instead of the aluminum carrier the BMC diffs have.
    Last edited by metalshapes; 09-28-2012 at 07:08 AM.

  8. #8
    MP metalshapes's Avatar
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    Bolted up and in the car...

    9 21 12 019.jpg

    One bad thing I did, as far as unsprung weight is concerned, is getting a set of spacers/ adapters.

    9 21 12 020.jpg

    But with those, I can use the same set of wheels & tires I have for my Abarth.

    Which saves me a lot of money, and I can keep one set of tires fresher.

    7 27 12 005.jpg

    7 27 12 006.jpg

  9. #9
    Airman
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    Very cool. Haven't seen many of those! Nice save.

  10. #10
    Always loved those things. Reminds me of a baby Indy roadster... Glad to see you're getting to enjoy it again!

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