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Thread: My latest build, 51 Chev PeeCup

  1. #11
    Airman ELpolacko's Avatar
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    Haven't done any quarter elip suspensions in a while. None of which I ever shot photos of.

    Working on the body of this truck right now. Narrowed a 1955 Chevy dash and mocked it in place.



    I just cut the entire firewall off last night and starting to load in all the under-dash gear. Came up with some cool and functional ideas, more pictures soon.

  2. #12
    Airman EnragedHawk's Avatar
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    Man, I always love seeing your builds. One of the many reasons I intend to pretty much start my truck over.
    Experience has been a brutal but effective teacher.
    EnragedHawk's Custom Creations
    55 Chevy Panel Build Thread

  3. #13
    Always love seeing your work! Very informative.

  4. #14
    Airman TexasSpeed's Avatar
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    Your work is just way too clean to be hidden under an old truck. This is the level of fabrication that I want to achieve some day..

  5. #15
    Airman ELpolacko's Avatar
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    51 Chevy PeeCup project wrap up.

    We left off the last post with a completed rolling chassis, HERE and it all happened since then. The guys at Metro Auto Auctions asked us to step on the gas and finish this truck for the Barrett Jackson Auction. I have to admit that we did not make the deadline, we missed it by three weeks. Consider this, Dr Marvelus and I took this from a rolling chassis in early July to a completed, painted and upholstered truck at the first of February. Quite a lot of work for the two of us! We did have help though, Doug Stinson of All American Upholstery did the leather work inside the cab and Nessie's Autocenter did the pink-metal and paint.

    So here is what happened in the meantime.

    The cab was blocked into place and the floor repairs were assessed. The previous shop did some pretty poor patchwork and did not provide the new body mount holes. All four corners of the cab were either in need of repair or were done improperly leaving rusty substructure in place. Once positioned and attached to the frame, Dr Marvelus mounted up the doors to see how out of square the body was and did the required pushing and pulling to get the new Dynacorn doors to fit somewhat properly. Both the body and the doors were in pretty poor shape but the good Dr kept at it until things lined up correctly. At that point the guys at Metro wanted a custom firewall with a polished aluminum panel. It was my idea to make that panel open up so you have access to the brake system hidden behind and the electrical panel. While I was dropping off Anthony's 32 3W at the Lone Star Round Up last year, the guys in the booth next to us had a '55 Chevy dash in pretty good condition. Since the Metro Guys already had the dash and bezel from Dakota Digital for a stock '55 Chevy it just made sense that we use the entire dash. To make it fit, I cut four inches from the center of the dash and the good Dr cut off the remainder of '55 that we didn't need and added new material to the leading edge of the dash to match up to the '51 Chevy truck windshield.


    Firewall structural supports, Dash rail and brake components




    Dr Marvelus working on the '55 dash installation



    Kugel Brake system re-engineered for better ergonomics and more compact



    Door fitment, patch panels



    Fabricated windshield trim and dash extensions on the doors



    Cab fabrication under control we updated the engine compartment to showcase the engine a bit better than the stock fenderwells could. We started with a Direct Sheetmetal kit and to be honest, we would have been better starting without. Dr Marvelus had to do quite a bit of modification to get the panels to fit the radiator support and with the firewall pushed back, the back edges of the inner fenders didn't reach far enough.


    Fitting the Direct Sheet Metal inner fenders



    Things got pretty hurried and I didn't shoot too many pictures as we went, but most of it was fairly routine work. At one point we made the decision that the previous shop's work welding up the seam in the middle of the stock hood pretty much ruined it. Instead of cutting out the recessed joint and flanges, they MIG welded the entire seam and started filling the 1/16" deep channel for the stock trim with weld. This really distorted the hood and was going to require more work than we or the customers really wanted to get involved with. Metro bought a Dynacorn replacement hood, we regret doing so now. It took more work to get it to fit than the stock hood would have been to repair. I do not recommend anyone purchase one of these hoods unless you are very desperate for one. The hood was short and curled under at the front which required Dr Marvelus to cut the structure out and flatten out the nose more than 1 1/2". The next problem was the location and shape of the hood hinges and bracing. It had to be cut apart and reshaped. And after two solid weeks of work the hood is taller on the driver side and longer on the passenger side forcing us to move the entire front clip over to the left side of the truck to get the hood gap at the cowl to even be close.


    After 80+ hours of work to get the hood to fit this good.




    The bed, rear fenders, running boards et-al required countless hours of cutting and shaping to get close, it honestly was all a blur to push the sheet metal work fast enough to get out for paint. The guys at Metro AA wanted to accelerate an already hurried pace, the front clip and body went to paint before we even started the bed work. We proposed some changes along the way but they didn't want to spend the time so style wise, what the other shop had already started was our job to finish and push to paint. As the last piece of sheet metal left our shop it was Thanksgiving time.

    With the sheet metal off, the exhaust system and final chassis details got attended to, steering supports, anti-roll bar, threaded bungs for accessories etc. This is when we blew apart the chassis for chrome, polish and powdercoat. Russel's Custom Polishing did an absolute amazing job and some seriously personal service. I HIGHLY recommend these guys! Kerr West did the chrome on rush job and Desert Powder Coating knocked out the frame, parts and even re-coated the headers. It was nice to get a break and catch up on a few of the other projects that got shelved for this build. But as the parts started trickling back in, we jumped in with both feet on the reassembly. All Stainless Steel brake and fuel lines, body color painted engine, trans and rear axle housing. This chassis looks fantastic.


    C4 Corvette front end parts all polished up!



    Suspension installed and brake lines going on






  6. #16
    Airman ELpolacko's Avatar
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    The day after Christmas, we got the call the cab was painted. Chassis on the trailer and picked up the cab. Then the rush was, wiring was top priority because there was so much of it. Inside the dash there is an Ididit Keyless Ignition (more on that later) Dakota Digital climate control, Dakota Digital automatic headlight and timed dome light module and the Dakota Digital VHX module and a few relays plus a compass and outside temp module, the Haywire Inc E-series fuse panel and a half dozen more relays, line lock, coil, MSD 6al, wiper motor and a Vintage Air Gen II three vent AC/Heat-Defrost unit all snuggled around the brake booster and cylinder.



    The wiring fun begins! How did you spend the week after Christmas?
    And here is where the fun started. The quality of the components was less than fantastic. The Keyless Ignition gave us nothing but fits. I recommend everyone not use this. The wire leads were less than generous as advertised and literally fell out of the connectors. The functionality of this unit also leaves a bit to be desired. I see no convenience to using this over a traditional ignition switch. Plus, in an emergency the shut down time seems like an eternity and if for some reason you lose your brake lights through an electrical problem or if you have a brake light switch failure or if you use a hydraulic brake light switch and happen to lose the brake system, you cannot shut the engine off. There is no failsafe.



    Yep, bad crimps. The wiring just fell out.



    The hours rolled on and the zip ties copped for it in the hundreds as Dr Marvelus and I restrung the entire underdash.







    Under dash done, Doug had been taking apart out harnesses going down the toe boards and flattening them out.



    Just as we were wrapping up the wiring the painted parts for the front sheet metal started showing up and we could get out of the cab and let Doug do his thing. But first we had to install the power windows. This is where things really started to fall off the tracks. The Dynacorn doors are decent, but not exact reproductions. An the New Relics power window regulators did not fit as advertised. Dr Marvelus had to cut away the landing ledge inside the door just to be able to install the regulator, then there was no tail mount to keep it from moving around once bolted in to the stock three holes of the original regulator. When the glass went in, the regulators hit themselves and the windows would not go up or down. Many frustrating hours clicked by before deciding to grind and round off everything on the regulators so that if they did hit, they wouldn't hang up on each other.


    Dr putting in the felts for the first or second time, I don't recall





    That problem solved, the next one popped up. We built the dash extensions onto the original door window moldings. The truck is a '51 and have a vent window and frameless glass. The doors and windows we got are for an earlier truck with framed glass. The window channels are 1/4" thicker than the door moldings were designed for. This caused a major problem that required stepping back a few steps. We made a new template for glass without the frame and used the narrower felts to get the door frames to fit properly and this also gave us extra clearance for the mechanisms, HOORAY!



    All sorts of things were going together, AC and heater lines, inner fenders and such, the radiator and gear went in and I started fabrication of the aluminum shroud and mount for the Lincoln Mark VIII electric fan.

    Fan shroud in the raw





    Fan shroud polished and installed







    The time was running out on us and we were still missing parts to put on. The week before the dead line my good friend Tom brought in the bed wood but we still didn't have a bed or front fenders. But we had the dash so that went and got wired up.





    Had a visit from the Phoenix Suns Center...






    Just a few days before our deadline the bed and front fenders showed up. Doug had the headliner and door panels in and the carpets done. Seat was MIA but it didn't matter. The deadline came and we had way too much to get done. So we took a solid weekend off for the first time in three or so weeks. The following Monday the push was back on. I had to make headlight mounts as the one we needed were long gone. Tail gate supports, hood supports, stereo system, glove box and fabricated trims to finish off the dash around the steering column. We were still plagued with weird issues like the fan coming on if you had the driver side door closed but the passenger side open. Broken glass from a stray broken drill bit and a fuel sending unit that didn't work with the gauge system. It is all sorted out now and I have to say, this is one of the best driving cars/trucks to come out of my shop. It's a blast to drive, handles incredibly well and is very well manner even on rough pavement.








    Here are the final pictures.

    From the rear



    From the front



    Engine compartment



    Bed, yes it's that orange out in the sun. Great depth and color!





    Shot of the interior, nice place to sit. Thanks Doug




  7. #17
    Airman ELpolacko's Avatar
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    Just a quick addendum for you guys here on Dogfight; the time and energy I spend drawing all the suspension components, doing math and staying up all night trying to figure out all the little details of how this thing was supposed to work paid off in great dividends at the end. I am confident the owner will never truly appreciate how much effort I put into this even though he has a garage full (prancing horse brand) of exotica.

    I can tell you this, this is one of the most solid driving vehicles I have ever done. Rides much smoother than the average C4 Corvette but handles at least as good. I just wish I had better seats to hold my ass in place!



  8. #18
    Airman
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    Cool

    El P, good to "see" you here!

    Bitchin build.

  9. #19
    Airman
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    I have been in the car hobby {{ hot rods, race cars, customs and so on}}}for over 55 years and this is the best work I have ever had the pleasure to look at.

  10. #20
    DAMN NICE TRUCK !!!!! The build quality is some of the best I've seen

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